enfor consultants ltd.
Login / Register

Demonstrating Objectives in Higher Level Plans


Overview Map

The below map portrays the Blueberry Creek Landscape Unit, which is a portion of the Easton River Resource Management Zone, and several colour-themed layers of resource information, including a long-term timber-harvesting concept. Following are projections of a conceptual development pattern over the first three harvesting passes, with green-up.

Overview Map

This demonstrates graphically the existing and potential future condition of the Blueberry Creek Landscape Unit under one development scenario; other options could be similarly tested during preparation of objectives, and to describe graphically the future condition of the area. This long term harvesting concept is a conservative example of the flow of resource management objectives and strategies between planning levels in the Blueberry Creek Landscape Unit.

Several viewpoints portray the development over time. Four views are shown here (VP 2, 3, and 8 at treetop levels; VP 8 approximately 1000m above treetop). Examples of various objectives are labelled; refer to the list of objectives for the reference to examples.

Viewpoint 8 Blueberry Creek: Viewing Northeast

Viewpoint 8, existing state with resource layers for Visual Quality Objectives (VQO), Grizzly Habitat (corridor), Fish Habitat (corridor) and Watershed

The following forestry renderings portray various levels of development from Viewpoint 8, including:

  • Viewpoint 8, Pass 1: state after the first harvest pass at year 15 from present, with labelled example of various objectives
  • Viewpoint 8, Pass 2: state after the second harvest pass at year 61 from present, with prior green-up.
  • Viewpoint 8, Pass 3: state after the third harvest pass at year 106 from present, with prior green-up.
  • detailed zoomed in views in Viewpoint 8, Pass 3 at 106 years from present

Examples of various objectives include:

Sample Rendering ReferenceRMZ ObjectivesLandscape Unit Objectives
8-1 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears
8-2 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears
8-3Wildlife - Grizzly Bears 
8-4Wildlife - Grizzly Bears 
8-5 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears
8-6 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears
8-7 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears
8-8Visual Quality 
8-9 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears
8-11Wildlife - Grizzly Bears 

Viewpoint 8, Pass 1: state after the first harvest pass at year 15 from present, with labelled example of various objectives

Viewpoint 8, Pass 2: state after the second harvest pass at year 61 from present, with prior green-up.

Viewpoint 8, Pass 3: state after the third harvest pass at year 106 from present, with prior green-up.

Viewpoint 8, Close-up View in Pass 3 (106 years from present)

Viewpoint 2 Blueberry Creek: Viewing Southeast to Scott Creek Watershed

Viewpoint 2, existing state with resource layers for Visual Quality Objectives (VQO), Grizzly Habitat (corridor), Fish Habitat (corridor) and Watershed

The following forestry renderings portray various levels of development from Viewpoint 2, including:

  • Viewpoint 2, Pass 1: state after the first harvest pass at year 15 from present, with labelled example of various objectives
  • Viewpoint 2, Pass 2: state after the second harvest pass at year 61 from present, with prior green-up.
  • Viewpoint 2, Pass 3: state after the third harvest pass at year 106 from present, with prior green-up.
  • detailed zoomed in views in Viewpoint 2, Pass 3 at 106 years from present

Examples of various objectives include:

Sample Rendering ReferenceRMZ ObjectivesLandscape Unit ObjectivesForest Development Plan and Silviculture Prescription Implementation
2-1 Water Quality and Fish Habitat 
2-2Visual Quality   
2-3 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears  
2-4 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears  
2-5Visual Quality   
2-6 Wildlife - Grizzly Bears  
2-7Visual Quality   
2-8Wildlife - Grizzly Bears   
2-9Fish Habitat   
2-10Wildlife - Grizzly Bears  
2-11  Water Quality and Fish Habitat
2-12  Water Quality and Fish Habitat
2-13  Visual Quality
2-14  Access
2-15  Wildlife - Grizzly Bears



Viewpoint 2, Pass 1: state after the first harvest pass at year 15 from present, with labelled example of various objectives

Viewpoint 2, Pass 2: state after the second harvest pass at year 61 from present, with prior green-up.

Viewpoint 2, Pass 3: state after the third harvest pass at year 106 from present, with prior green-up.

Viewpoint 3 Blueberry Creek Landscape Unit: Southwest to Blueberry Creek and West Creek

Viewpoint 3 Blueberry Creek Landscape Unit: Southwest to Blueberry Creek and West Creek

Viewpoint 3, existing state with resource layers for Visual Quality Objectives (VQO), Grizzly Habitat (corridor), Fish Habitat (corridor) and Watershed

Viewpoint 3, Pass 1: state after the first harvest pass at year 15 from present, with labelled example of various objectives

Viewpoint 3, Pass 3: state after the third harvest pass at year 106 from present, with prior green-up

Viewpoint 7 Blueberry Creek: Elevated View Southeast to Scott Creek Watershed

Viewpoint 3, existing state with resource layers for Visual Quality Objectives (VQO), Grizzly Habitat (corridor), Fish Habitat (corridor) and Watershed

Viewpoint 3, Pass 1: state after the first harvest pass at year 15 from present, with labelled example of various objectives

Viewpoint 3, Pass 3: state after the third harvest pass at year 106 from present, with prior green-up

Flow of Resource Management Direction Between Planning Levels

Resource management direction in plans should flow through the planning levels -- from general to specific. Objectives and strategies for a resource management zone (RMZ) provide strategic land and resource management direction that is reflected in lower levels of planning such as landscape unit plans. In turn, objectives and strategies in landscape unit plans are reflected in operational plans like forest development plans and silviculture prescriptions.

This insert demonstrates the concept of the flow of resource management direction between planning levels, present and desired future conditions for a number of resource objectives. To support the examples, graphic renderings derived using GIS technology show how the flow between the Easton River resource management zone, the Blueberry Creek landscape unit, and a forest development plan and silviculture prescription for an area within the Blueberry Creek drainage might look when implemented on the ground.

1. Resource Management Zone Level

(for Easton River resource management zone)

Easton River RMZ Objectives Easton River RMZ Strategies Sample Renderings Reference
Wildlife - Grizzly Bears

Retain high value grizzly bear habitat in the Easton Creek drainage.

Minimise the period that grizzly bears are exposed to disturbances resulting from forestry activities in the Easton Creek drainage.
Minimise forestry activities, including road building, in the following key areas: seepage areas, riparian floodplains, meadows, fens, wetlands, deciduous south-facing slopes, and avalanche chutes.
7-1, 3-3, 2-10, 8-3, 8-11
Schedule harvesting activities to maximise periods of inactivity between forestry operations.
7-2, 2-8, 8-4, 3-4
Control access into areas of high value grizzly bear habitat.
Approximate a four-pass system for forest harvesting with 30 year leave periods.
7-2, 2-8, 3-5
Fish Habitat

Maintain the quality of high value fisheries spawning and rearing habitat, as shown in map 2.
Minimise the impacts of surface erosion and sedimentation from forest harvesting, road building and road maintenance activities. 2-9, 7-3
Visual Quality

Maintain visual quality in areas of significant scenic importance for recreation and tourism, as shown on map 7.
Complete a visual landscape inventory to identify visually sensitive areas within the areas depicted on map 7, and the remainder of West Creek. 7-4
Manage landscape disturbances in the areas shown on map 7 according to the following guidelines:

- in visible foreground areas and important or prominent midground areas, disturbance may be discernible but not prominent in the landscape;

- in less important or prominent foreground areas, most midground areas and important background areas, disturbance should remain visually subordinate in the landscape; and

- in most background areas and less important midground areas, landscape alterations may be visually apparent, but should be designed to blend into the landscape in form and colour.


3-7



2-7, 3-1



2-2, 2-5, 3-2, 8-8

2. Landscape Unit Level

(for Landscape Unit within Easton River resource management zone)

Blueberry Creek Landscape Unit Objectives Blueberry Creek Landscape Unit Strategies Sample Renderings Reference
Wildlife - Grizzly Bears

Protect high value (class 1 and 2) grizzly bear habitat in areas of known high and moderate grizzly bear density, as shown in map 6.




Minimise disturbance to grizzly bears by avoiding extended periods of access into the Blueberry drainage
Where areas of operable timber and class 1 and 2 grizzly bear habitat (seepage areas, riparian floodplains, meadows, fens, wetlands, deciduous south-facing slopes and avalanche chutes) coincide, apply the following guidelines:  
- locate roads at least 150 metres from grizzly bear habitat;
8-1, 8-2; 8-5, 2-3
- retain areas of mature forest cover of approximately 100 metres in width adjacent to class 1 and 2 grizzly bear habitat to provide for bedding and security cover. The degree of cover will vary with the density of coniferous trees in forested areas; and
2-6, 8-6
use non-clearcut systems adjacent to areas of mature forest cover retained for grizzly bear use.
3-6, 2-4, 8-7
Permanently deactivate the Carmen West Forest Service Road (west of Blueberry Creek) from the km 16 signpost. From that point, control non-industrial access during forest operations. Reopen when harvested areas reach rotation age.
8-9
After plantations are satisfactorily re-stocked, restrict access on the Carmen West Forest Service Road and on the McDonald Forest Service Road by access control points and permanent road deactivation. Do not re-enter this watershed until mid-way through the rotation. 8-9
Water Quality and Fish Habitat

Protect critical fish habitat in the Blueberry drainage (see map 7) from sedimentation effects from logging and road development and maintenance.
For Scott Creek watershed, no more than 15% of the total area is to be less than 10 m tall 2-1
Minimise the number of stream crossings throughout the rotation.  
Conduct annual inspections of all drainage structures on the road network by September 30, and complete all identified repairs by October 15 of the same year.  
Visual Quality

Manage scenic areas shown on Map 4 to meet the visual quality objective of partial retention when viewed from viewpoint #3 and km 13 - 23 on the Steward Forest Service Road.
Use a mixture of forest cover and openings in the foreground of the Steward Forest Service Road to assist in managing visual quality in the foreground, midground and background areas. The immediate foreground is considered to be approximately 40m to either side of the road. 3-1